How to continually make the case for fundamental science: Arthur Wynne Gold Medal talk by Jim Woodgett

Read “How to continually make the case for fundamental science: from the perspective of a protein kinase”, a summary of Jim Woodgett’s Arthur Wynne Gold Medal talk presented at the Canadian Society of Molecular Biosciences annual meeting held in Banff in April 2018. This summary was published in Canadian Science Publishing’s Biochemistry and Cell Biology, one of the CSMB official journals.

Abstract: The strength of the scientific process is its immunity from human frailties. The built-in error correction and robustness of principles protect and nurture truth, despite both intended and unintended errors and naivety. What it doesn’t secure is understanding of how the scientific sausage is made. Here, a scientific journey revolving around a single protein that spans nearly 35 years is used to illustrate the twists and turns that can accompany any scientific path. Lessons learned from such exploration speak to the need for story-telling in communicating scientific meaning — and the effectiveness of this will influence future investment and understanding of the scientific endeavor.

Read the full article in Biochemistry and Cell Biology:

https://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdf/10.1139/bcb-2019-0130

Science was not an Election 2019 issue – but it should be a priority for the next Government

By Tarik Möröy and Katalin Tóth — published in National Newswatch — Oct 25 2019

During Election 2019, the issue of poorly funded scientific research in Canada was not addressed by the major Parties and their leaders. Now, scientists across the country are concerned that they will not have the needed Federal support to make groundbreaking discoveries that move Canada and the world forward.

Investing in scientific research isn’t just important for scientists, it impacts the daily lives of all Canadians. From innovative treatments to cure diseases that affect millions of Canadians, to new technologies that can help us address the global climate crisis, scientific research is essential to confronting the issues that we face today and that our children will meet in the future. These investments are not simply expenses; they contribute significantly to the prosperity of our country, which gains from the work of highly-trained scientists, and the knowledge they generate, to drive today’s innovation-based economy. + + +

Imogen Coe, Farah Qaiser and more on rawtalk podcast #66: Investing in Tomorrow: Why Are You Voting Science?

Why are we voting science? Listen to Imogen Coe (CSMB VP), Farah Qaiser (at-large member of the CSMB trainee committee), Molly Shoichet, David Naylor & Amanda Veri give advice on how we can speak up for science in the upcoming federal election, on the rawtalk podcast.

Click here to listen:

https://www.rawtalkpodcast.com/episode/66

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